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Interior Design Sample Post: 6 Rules For Redecorating Your Home In Vintage Farmhouse Style

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The following is a 889-word sample post on interior design that markets B2C services to millennial consumers who are in the middle/bottom of the marketing funnel. Written by one of BlogMutt's 3,000+ talented writers, this post helps to drive the decision stage of decorating a new home. Although this sample post takes a specific interior design viewpoint, our writers come from diverse backgrounds and are able and willing to write on many different topics. 


 

Comfortable, functional, long-lasting and based on diligent work, these are some reasons why we love vintage farmhouse design. In interior design, vintage farmhouse contains both a level of quality and a level of love that we find inspiring, and hope you do, too. The following are some of the rules of design we follow when it comes to interior design in the vintage farmhouse style. 

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Rule #1: Re-Use Materials

One of the best parts of farmhouse vintage design is the fact that it is so resourceful and ecological. Farmers are always salvaging parts and supplies to keep costs low, and we use this principle in our designs. Great finds come from many out-of-the-way places; they may not be chic, but we enjoy our thrift-shop, antique store, and found items all the more because of it. 

Reusable materials include taking old lumber and repurposing it as a table, reusing various household items in our design and decorations. The options are limitless, but we do encourage people not to take it too far. We once saw an entire bathroom out in someone's flower garden, not recommended!

What does BlogMutt do, exactly? Learn more here.

Rule #2: Rustic Is In!

Rustic is an old word, and it fits interior design. From Latin, rustic basically means rural, but we think it means so much more. Whether it is a weathered picture frame perfect for showcasing your wedding photos, or a classic wood stove, rustic design fits a vintage farmhouse home. According to Dictionary.com, rustic may be artless or uncouth, but we think that rural and simple is anything but!

Rustic is northern European meets the North American plains at the foothills of the Rockies. Rustic design takes the rural themes of agriculture, of people in touch with nature and with the earth, and makes a liveable home out of it. When you are looking to design your home in a rustic vintage farmhouse style, think of earth tone colors, natural woods, river rock, and a cozy fireplace with a large armchair. 

Rule #3: Vintage Means Old

We know, that is kind of like saying that the red dog is red, but it is important when considering your vintage farmhouse. Every vintage farmhouse has that one item that does not really fit with the rest, but the owners would not part with it for all the world because of the history it has with them or their family. When you are selecting items for the interior design of your home, you might also find or already have something that you absolutely love, because it fits you. 

That is great, as vintage farmhouse design understands the power of old classics and treasured items. We embrace and find room for those specific items that grab a part of your history to fit right alongside the refinished classic gas stove, cozy armchair and sofa, and the beautiful log mantlepiece. Your home will fit your life, because that is an essential part of vintage farmhouse design.

Rule #4: Farmhouse Meets Hunting Cabin

Farmhouses and hunting cabins are functionally different, but much of the difference is based on location. We believe in design for any location, so we are not afraid of a little bit of hunting cabin feel to a farmhouse design. From the trophy cases and the beautiful throw rugs to the functional canning kitchen and a large family dining table, hunting cabin and vintage farmhouse really do fit together. When you are designing your home, don't be afraid to take some time and integrate different aspects of the rustic and rural life into a modern 21st-century home. 

We understand that many of our clients are not actually hunting or farming, but they are attracted to the simple lifestyle that vintage farmhouse shows. Family, hard work, living from the labor of your hands—these are what tie farmhouse and hunting cabin together, and we love them all. 

Rule #5: Use Blankets & Rugs

In case you have not noticed on the other rules so far, blankets and rugs are a good part of vintage farmhouse. That is because an old farmhouse is often large and drafty, so people have traditionally used rugs and blankets to increase the comfort and warmth of their living quarters. We believe this adds to the charm of a farmhouse design and incorporate them into various rooms in the house. The bedroom is not the only room where you need to be comfortable!

Rule #6: Love the Earthen Colors

Scandinavian design may love black and white, but our modern farmhouse design loves the browns and russet reds, the off-whites and metallic grays of a working farmhouse. Too minimalist in color and a working farmhouse runs the risk of never looking clean. A dark slate floor masks over the time children forget their boots after feeding chickens, an off white counter hides the tell-tale signs of long baking. Yes, we understand many modern homeowners will not actually run a working farmhouse, but the color scheme still matches the design theme. 

As you see, our rules for vintage farmhouse design are fairly simple, but we believe our work speaks for itself. Feel free to stop by our design showcase (insert link to gallery) or browse our vintage farmhouse themed posts on the blog. Or, if you realize that you love everything vintage and everything farmhouse, then contact us to book a design consultation today!

 

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

We eat our own dog food. It's true. We use BlogMutt's service for our own blog. The same writers that write for our clients write many of our blog posts—like this one. Any posts with an author named "BlogMutt" were written by a writer from our talent pool of 3,000+ U.S.-based writers. We sure couldn't do it without them.

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